My Favorite App: PicCollage

March 12, 2014

Despite the plethora of speech and language apps available for phones and tablets, I actually don’t use them that much in therapy. This is mainly because I find that most of my little clients are so proficient at using touchscreens that they tune me out as soon as they get their hands on a phone or tablet and all meaningful interaction ceases. However, there are times when I find that a specific app either makes my job a little easier or keeps the child engaged a little longer, and that’s when I pull out my tablet.

PicCollage truly is my favorite app to use in speech and language therapy sessions. I initially downloaded this free app (available for iOS and Android devices) just to make collages of pictures that my own kids could bring to school for show and tell. Then one day I had an epiphany; I could use PicCollage to create a picture schedule. Prior to that, when I needed to create a picture schedule for a session, I had been taking pictures of the activities for the day, printing them out, cutting them out, and attaching them to a board with two-sided tape. With PicCollage, I can either use pictures that I’ve taken or search the web (through the app) for a suitable picture. Then I just add them to the collage, line them up, add a heading, and I’m done. At the beginning of each session, my 4-year-old client looks at the schedule and tells me everything we’re going to do for the day. After each activity, he gets to swipe the picture into the trash to show that the activity is finished. (This is definitely his favorite part.) When all of the activities have made it into the trash, the session is over. This method is much more efficient and saves some paper too.

PicCollage Picture Schedule

Parents can use PicCollage in a similar way for difficult daily routines. For example, if your child has trouble remembering to complete all of the steps needed to get ready for bed, you can take pictures of the things he needs to do and put them in order in the collage (shower, pajamas, toothbrush, book, bathroom). Then, as he completes each item, he moves it to the trash. Once all the tasks are complete, it’s time for bed. Picture schedules are particularly helpful for children on the autism spectrum who need routine and predictability built into their day. This app provides a portable way to take picture schedules with you out of the house.

PicCollage Bedtime Picture Schedule

Another use I’ve found for PicCollage is creating interactive “worksheets.” I was working on possessive nouns with one child, and rather than using a traditional worksheet in which she would draw a line to match each object to its owner, she manipulated them on the screen and formulated a sentence like, “It is the dog’s bone.” The use of the touchscreen seemed less like work to her than a worksheet would have, but I still got her to practice the grammatical structure we were targeting. (And she got to put the pictures in the trash when she was done with them.)

PicCollage Interactive Worksheet

Here are a few other ideas for using PicCollage to support language development:

  • After a vacation, put a few pictures from your trip in sequence. Then, have your child use the pictures to help tell someone about the trip. (Skills addressed: formulating sentences, creating narratives)
  • Take pictures of the steps in a process (e.g. making a sandwich) and put them in random order on the screen. Then, have your child put the pictures in the correct order and tell how to do the task. (Skills addressed: sequencing, formulating sentences)
  • Use the web to find a collection of seemingly random pictures (shoes, car, airplane, carrot, giraffe, bird, apple, stop sign…), and then have your child find things that are alike in some way and tell how they are alike. (An airplane and a bird both fly. An apple and a stop sign are both red.) (Skills addressed: comparing, formulating sentences, identifying features of nouns)

The possibilities for using PicCollage to support speech and language development are really limitless. If you have another idea, please share it in a comment.


Language development? There’s An App For That.

July 8, 2013

At the end of a recent speech and language therapy session, I was allowing a preschool-age child to use my Android tablet as a reinforcer for having worked hard throughout the session. I opened an app that I recently added for my daughter to use and suddenly had a great idea. The app, PBS Kids Photo Factory, can be used to target location concepts, facial body parts, and size words.

Here are the steps to follow once you’ve downloaded the app:

  1. Tap the camera button in the app.
  2. Select “Take Photo” to take a picture of your child using your phone or tablet’s camera.
  3. Once you’re satisfied with the photo, tap the checkmark.
  4. Tap decorate, and select a show your child enjoys.
  5. Choose one of the characters by tapping it.

To target the comprehension of location concepts and facial body parts, you can have your child move the character around her face to different spots you tell her. Examples include:

  • Put Elmo next to you.
  • Put Elmo under your nose.
  • Put Elmo on top of your head.
  • Put Elmo between your eyes.
  • Put Elmo below your chin.
  • Turn Elmo upside down.

For the expressive use of these concepts, the adult can move the character around and ask the child, “Where is Elmo now?”

Elmo between the eyes

The characters can be made smaller or larger by either pinching or stretching them. Then, they can be used to work on size words. To target receptive language, you could give commands like, “Make Super Why bigger,” or, “Make Clifford smaller.” For expressive language work, the adult would change the size and ask the child, “Did Caillou get bigger or smaller?”

The one caveat is that your child cannot just be left alone with the device and expected to learn these concepts. As always, it’s the interaction with another person that counts. The device is merely a fun tool.

This activity is appropriate for older toddlers and preschoolers, as well as elementary-age children with language delays.

This app is available for iPod Touch, iPhone, Android phone, Android Tablet, and Kindle tablet.

What other apps do you know that can be used this way? Leave a comment to tell us!