Sibling Play

I recently came across this video from a few years ago of my own kids, and it got me thinking about all of the skills infants and toddlers can learn by playing with their older siblings.

My then four and a half year old son thought he was teaching his 10-month-old sister the words “above” and “below.” But he was really doing so much more than that. As a Speech-Language Pathologist, I was so excited to see my daughter exhibiting joint attention (two people aware that they are both attending to the same object or activity for a social purpose, such as when a child points to an airplane and then looks to his mother to make sure she sees that he is pointing and what he is pointing to.) Not only is she engaged with her brother in this simple game, but she also looks over at me (behind the camera), as if to say “Do you see this awesome game we’re playing?”

In addition to the social communication skills my daughter was showing off, Nicole Winningham, an Infant Toddler Developmental Specialist and owner of Partnering with Parents, noted many other developmental milestones on display in this short clip:

  • Standing up (gross motor)
  • Shifting weight (gross motor)
  • Object permanence (cognitive)
  • Attending to an activity (cognitive)
  • Imitation (personal-social)
  • Index finger isolation (fine motor)

You can see from the video above how many skills are practiced in less than 30 seconds of sibling play. Kids with developmental delays need many hours of active engagement each week to help them catch up to their peers. Infants and toddlers learn best through natural routines. With support from a qualified provider like a Speech-Language Pathologist, Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, or Infant Toddler Developmental Specialist, parents can learn how to help their children using strategies embedded in everyday routines, like playing with their big brothers and sisters.

Big brother and little sister

What if your child does not have an older sibling (or a typically developing sibling)? Joining a playgroup, going to kids’ play places like baby gym or the park, or spending a few hours a week in a childcare setting can all be great ways to give your child the opportunity to benefit from social interactions with role model peers.

 

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